Safer Skin in Singapore is Happening

Too many weeks ago, I had an almost 2-hour phone chat with Olivia Choong– another ‘kid’ who, I highly suspect, suffers from mental hyperactivity like me– about RMS Lip2Cheek, turning 30, loving body oils, good skin turned bad turned good, pesky mice who snack on our moisturizers and love letters while we’re away and lastly, SaferSkin.org.

SaferSkin.org is an online campaign launched by Green Drinks Singapore that provides tips on which toxic ingredients to look out for, local resources of natural and organic skincare and cosmetic products, fun tips on making natural skincare products, and news on the latest products and services that are skin and health-friendly.

Yes, it’s pretty much like Eco Beauty Secrets minus the occasional rants but SaferSkin aims to focus on cosmetic safety issues and awareness in Singapore which I sometimes, honestly, am not very updated and involved with lah.

Here are some snippets from the official press release:

Through this campaign, Green Drinks Singapore aims to educate women and men alike not just about the harmful effects of chemicals on the skin, but also to encourage them to read the label and opt for safer products, whether it is for themselves, their children or pets. As a result, the organisation hopes to see beauty corporations move towards omitting toxins from their skincare and cosmetic formulations. The website shows that there are safer alternatives in the skincare and beauty industry, in natural and organic skincare and makeup products.

Co-founder and Campaigner of Green Drinks Singapore, Olivia Choong felt this campaign was necessary after understanding the health and environmental impacts behind skincare and beauty industry practices, especially when similar campaigns have been run overseas, but hardly in Asia.

You can join the campaign by participating in discussions and info-sharing on their official website, Twitter and Pinterest.

About Green Drinks Singapore

Founded in November 2007, Green Drinks Singapore is a non-profit environmental movement that seeks to connect the community, businesses, NGO activists, media, academia and government for knowledge sharing and collaboration opportunities. We do this by organising informal talks every last Thursday of the month to allow opportunities for information sharing and networking, over drinks! We occasionally hold discussions, documentary screenings and workshops to further engage the public and participants.

Singapore is one of more than 800 cities with a Green Drinks presence.  Started in 1989 in London, the Green Drinks movement is a self-organising network that is meant to be simple and unstructured. To find out more about our activities, please visit www.greendrinkssingapore.com. The global site can be found at www.greendrinks.org.

 


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  • mikaella

    I’m having more and more hope that there are more blogs in Singapore that talks about organic and natural products.
    And I love your blog Vivi! Please update more often :-)

    • http://www.ecobeautysecrets.com Vivi

      Hi Mikaella, Thank you! :) You made my day!
      Don’t forget to visit Saferskin.org, too! :)

  • http://www.spring37.com Organic skin care

    I have visited the SaferSkin website and I think they really do a good job. In Europe there is a big trend for organic products such as skin care. I think more and more people in Asia get aware of its benefits, especially if they familiarize what kind of chemical ingredients many usual products contain.

    • http://www.ecobeautysecrets.com Vivi

      I think organic skin care is still relatively new in Asia but it’s gaining popularity, definitely. Only hang up I have is it’s becoming a tool for some scrupulous brands to highlight ‘organic’ and ‘natural’ as selling points of their products without understanding themselves what they actually meant. And because the trend is still new here, a lot of consumers aren’t aware and easily buy into the marketing lies.